Welcome to Tribal Spirit Gallery

Thanks for visiting our new site! We feature authentic and original artwork from the Northwest Coast of B.C. including hand-carved totem poles, masks, paddles, silver and gold jewelry, art prints, paintings, drums and bentwood boxes. Inspired by the Native art collection of my father Eric Lynds, the original gallery featured events within a gallery and museum setting of rushing water and totem poles in a 2,500 sq ft. space devoted to First Nations Aboriginal art of the Northwest Coast from 2005 to 2013. The gallery continues on with the memory of Eric Lynds, as an online presence with a generous collection of original artgifts and souvenirs.
-Jay Lynds

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We ship worldwide.  from anywhere in North America, or email:

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Locally serving the Pacific Northwest: British Columbia, BC including Vancouver, Coquitlam, Langley, Squamish, Whistler. Washington, WA including: Seattle, Tacoma, Snoqualmie, Point Roberts, Newport, Wenatchee. Oregon, OR including: Portland, Prescott, Salem, Grass Valley. Sharing culture with our friends on the prairies including: Alberta, AB: Calgary, Edmonton; Saskatchewan, SK; Manitoba, MB; and in the East: Ontario, ON: Ottawa, Toronto; Quebec, QC: Montreal; 

International shipping including the Netherlands, UK, Australia, Germany

The Story of the Inukshuk

 

The Inukshuk is an indelible icon of the North. Created originally as sign posts to the inuit to show where they had been, and to mark the best spots to fish!

Not of the Northwestern region, the Inukshuk has been adopted into our culture as a symbol of friendship, direction and guidance; inspired from the traditional purpose of wayfinding. The original Google Map Icon.

>Read about the Inukshuk:

Some great links and stories:

An RCMP officer watches an Inuit family build the Northern landmark, a sign of human activity on the vast arctic landscape (1931).

https://www.historicacanada.ca/content/heritage-minutes/inukshuk

During their summer hunts, Inuit families sometimes built stone piles, often in the shape of humans with outstretched arms. The Inuit call these sculptures "inukshuks." They marked good fishing sites, provided shelter from the wind, and sometimes offered a place for hunters to ambush caribou. On the wild arctic landscape they are often the only sign that humans have passed through, a symbol of the traditional Inuit way of life.

Inuksuk (Inukshuk)

Inuksuk (also spelled inukshuk, plural inuksuit) is a figure made of piled stones or boulders constructed to communicate with humans throughout the Arctic.

http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/inuksuk-inukshuk/

A tribute to my father, and the collector, Eric Lynds. 1942 - June 20, 2010.